Marketing Sustainability to Children: Insights from New Zealand, Netherlands, India and UK

This workshop is organised by the Academy of Marketing Special Interest Group on Sustainability in collaboration with Centre for Research in Marketing and Society (CReiMS), Sheffield University Management School

Programme

13.00-13.30 Registration, welcome and introduction to the workshop with Caroline Oates and Claudia Henninger

13.30-14.15 Leah Watkins and Rob Aitken, University of Otago, New Zealand

14.15-15.00 Suzanna Opree, Erasmus University Rotterdam

15.00-15.15 Break and refreshments

15.15-16.00 Pallavi Singh,Sheffield Hallam University

16.00-16.45 Victoria Circus,University of Sheffield

16.45-17.00 Break and refreshments

17.00-17.45 Emerging themes and future plans. Facilitated by Caroline Oates and Claudia Henninger

17.45 Workshop close

18.30 Drinks and dinner (optional)


Registration and Cost

Please register to attend via the University online store

https://onlineshop.shef.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/faculty-of-social-sciences/management-school/marketing-sustainability-to-children-insights-from-new-zealand-netherlands-india-and-uk

£20 for Academy of Marketing members

£30 for non-members

£10 for PhD students


Venue

Sheffield University Management School, Conduit Road, S10 1FL

Executive Board Room (Level D)


Abstracts and Speaker Biographies

Robert Aitken

Envisioning a new consumption future

Abstract

It is widely known and generally accepted that present rates of consumption and conventional forms of production are not sustainable and moving to a more sustainable future in relation to consumption and production is one of the greatest business and social challenges of our time (Sheth, Sethia and Srinivas, 2011). Equally as well-known are the social, psychological, political and economic factors involved in trying to change them. However, what is not so  well-known are consumers’ visions of the future and the nature of what a sustainable

consumption future might actually look like. Understanding how consumers envision a sustainable future could provide the basis upon which strategies to achieve it may be developed. Accordingly, this pilot project seeks to identify consumers’ visions of the future. To do this, we use ‘backcasting’, a projective research method, that works forward to privilege ideal scenarios as ends and then backwards to identify the pragmatic means to achieve them.

Biography

Robert Aitken is Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Marketing at the University of Otago. His academic and research interests are in the area of consumer behaviour and, in particular, marketing ethics, marketing to children and the commercialisation of childhood, sustainability, advertising, branding, and, corporate social responsibility. Robert is the co-director of the Otago Business School Research Network for Sustainable Business. He is a constructivist who is interested in how people make sense of the world and an idealist in believing he can help to make it a better one. Address: Department of Marketing, Otago Business School, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand. [Email: rob.aitken@otago.ac.nz]

Recent related publications

Aitken, R. and Watkins, L. (2017). ‘Harm or Good?’ Consumer Perceptions of Corporate

Strategic Giving in Schools. Journal of Consumer Affairs. Vol. 51(2), 406-432.

Watkins, L., Aitken, R., Robertson, K., Thyne, M. and Borzekowski, D. (2017).

Environmental Influences on Pre-Schooler’s Understanding of Brand Symbolism. Journal of

Marketing Intelligence and Planning. Vol. 35, 7.

Edirisingha, P., Ferguson, S. and Aitken, R. (2018). Bridging family boundaries: mediating

postmodern complexity in urban Sinhalese Sri Lankan families. Consumption, Markets &

Culture. 1-23.

Watkins, L., Aitken, R., Robertson, K. and Thyne, M. (2016). Public and Parental

Perceptions of and Concerns with Advertising to Pre-School Children. International Journal

of Consumer Studies. Vol. 40, 5, 592-600.

Watkins, L., Aitken, R., Robertson, K. and Thyne, M. (2016). Advertising’s Impact on Pre-

Schoolers’ Brand Knowledge and Materialism. International Journal of Consumer Studies.

Vol. 40, 5, 589-591.

Robertson, K., Thyne, M., Watkins, L. and Aitken, R. (2016). Correlates of Parental

Mediation of Pre-schooler’s Advertising Exposure. Young Consumers. Vol. 17, 4, 337-349.

Watkins, L., Aitken, R. and Mather, D. (2015). Conscientious Consumers: A Relationship

between Moral Foundations, Political Orientation and Sustainable Consumption. Journal of

Cleaner Production. Vol. 134, 137-146.

Edirisingha, P., Aitken, R. and Ferguson, S. (2015). From “Me” to “We”: Negotiating New

Family Identity through Meal Consumption in Asian Cultures. Qualitative Market Research:

An International Journal. Vol. 18, 4, 477-496.

Anderson, D., Halberstadt, J. and Aitken, R. (2013). “Entitlement attitudes predict students’

poor performance in challenging academic conditions.” International Journal of Higher

Education. Vol. 2, 2: 151-159.

Williams, J. and Aitken, R. (2011). Service Dominant Logic of Marketing and Ethics.

Journal Business Ethics. Vol. 102, 3, 439-454.

 

Victoria Circus

Reverse eco-socialisation from school to the home

Abstract

I will be presenting my PhD research exploring whether or not a process of reverse eco-socialisation occurs between primary school children (aged between eight and 11 years old) and their parents in the family home, following Key Stage Two environmental education delivered in school. I will be exploring environmental and relational factors that might underpin the process and potential 'strategies of influence' used by children.

Biography

I am an ESRC White Rose 1st year PhD student at Sheffield University Management School, UK. My PhD is supervised by Dr Caroline Oates, Dr Mark Blades and Dr Panayiota Alevizou in collaboration with Project Earth Rock. My research interests include eco-socialisation, environmental education and environmental psychology.  My previous research has studied reductions in meat consumption and sustainable alternatives to conventional meat, exploring perceptions to lab-grown meat, edible insects and meat substitutes. I am currently working on a revised manuscript for the British Food Journal with Dr Rosie Robison from the Global Sustainability Institute in Cambridge, UK. 

Recent publications

Circus, V. (2017). Alternative proteins: meet the future of meat. Journal of the Institution of Environmental Sciences, 26(1) p. 70-74. Available from:

https://www.the-ies.org/sites/default/files/journals/es_feeding_nine_billion_feb_17.pdf

 

Suzanna J. Opree

Promoting goods and the good life

Abstract

This presentation will focus on two studies, both of which are built on the premise that advertisers use certain cues to sell goods and services to children. The first study is a 2018 content analysis of the materialistic cues in Dutch child-directed television commercials: What strategies do advertisers use to inspire children to long for evermore products? A distinction is made between cues that simply foster longing, cues that suggest that goods bring happiness, popularity, and success, and cues that cater to identity building. The second study (Opree et al, 2016; see below) will be touched upon only briefly to demonstrate that the mere use of these cues can affect children’s perceived well-being and happiness.

Biography

Suzanna J. (Sanne) Opree is Senior Assistant Professor of Quantitative Research Methods in the Department of Media and Communication at the Erasmus School of History, Culture, and Communication at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. Sanne’s research line, “The good(s) life,” focuses on the effect of advertising and commercial media on youth’s materialism and well-being, and transcends the displinary boundaries of communication science, marketing, and psychology.

Recent publications

Van der Meulen, H., Kühne, R. & Opree, S. J. (OnlineFirst). Validating the Material Values Scale for children (MVS-c) for use in early childhood. Child Indicators Research. doi:10.1007/s12187-017-9456-9

Opree, S.J., Buijzen, M. & van Reijmersdal, E.A. (2018). Development and validation of the Psychological Well-Being scale for children (PWB-c). Societies, 8(1). doi:10.3390/soc8010018

Opree, S.J., Buijzen, M. & van Reijmersdal, E.A. (2016). The impact of advertising on children’s psychological wellbeing and life satisfaction. European Journal of Marketing, 50(11), 1975-1992. doi:10.1108/EJM-06-2015-0393


Pallavi Singh

Environmental reverse socialization: A conceptual model incorporating evidence from India

Abstract

This presentation will discuss conceptual model development of the environmental reverse socialisation process on the basis of existing literature and extend the model incorporating empirical evidence from my research in India.

Biography

I am a Senior Lecturer in Marketing at Sheffield Business School, Sheffield Hallam University, UK. Before commencing my academic career, I was a civil servant in India. I obtained my MBA in Marketing and PhD in Ethical Marketing from University of Sheffield Management School, Sheffield, UK. My research interests include environmental education in schools and higher education institutions, sustainable consumption in families, socialisation theory, green consumer behaviour, child influence in family purchase decision making and consumer food waste. I have presented my work at several national and international conferences. I am a reviewer with the Journal of Consumer Behaviour, South Asian Journal of Global Business Research and Journal of Consumer Ethics. I also serve as a consultant for social businesses, charity organisations and not- for-profit organisations.

Recent publications

Henninger, C. and Singh, P. (2017). Ethical consumption patterns and the link to purchasing sustainable fashion. In Sustainability in Fashion: a cradle to upcycle approach. Palgrave Macmillan.

Gentina, E. and Singh, P. (2015). How national culture and parental style affect the process of adolescents’ ecological re-socialization. Sustainability.

Nair, U. and Singh, P. (2013). Food for Thought: Can social media be a potential 'Learning Tool' for Universities? Educational Quest: International Journal of Education and Applied Social Science, 4 (2), 115-119.

 

Singh, P. (2017). The environmental education discourse: under-appraisal of the indigenousness. World Environmental Education Congress, September, Vancouver, Canada.

Singh, P., Oates, C.J., Sahadev, S. and Alevizou, P.(2016). Environmental socialization of adolescents in India. Child and Teen Consumption Conference, April, Aalborg University, Denmark.

Singh, P. (2015). Green is not cool, it’s nerdy. World Environmental Education Congress, June, University of Goteborg, Sweden.

Singh, P. (2013). Green School Program (GSP) - A case study from India. World Environmental Education Congress, June, Marrakech.

Singh, P. (2012). Environmental education in schools in India and its impact on intergenerational learning and environmental consumerism of Indian families. Academy of Marketing Conference, July, University of Southampton.

Singh, P. (2011). Green consumer behaviour in India: A micro-cultural perspective. Academy of Marketing Conference, July, University of Liverpool.

 

Leah Watkins

Building sustainable consumption and production literacy with NZ children

Abstract

The continued increase in human consumption is recognised as posing one of the greatest threats to social well-being and environmental sustainability. The most recent UNICEF Report, Building the Future: Children and the Sustainable Development Goals in Rich Countries (2017), compared children’s knowledge of sustainable consumption and production issues (SDG 12) globally and places NZ children 35th out of 37 countries. Given the importance of building a sustainable consumption future and meeting our responsibilities to the UN’s SDG’s, the fact that NZ children fare so poorly is cause for concern. We will report on a pilot study undertaken to develop a reliable measure of children’s (ages 11-12) knowledge, attitudes and behavior in relation to sustainable consumption and to pre-test content developed to meet gaps in this knowledge.

Biography

Dr Leah Watkins is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Marketing at the University of Otago, New Zealand. Her research interests lie in the area of marketing and society, specifically consumer lifestyles, ethical business/consumption, and children and marketing. Leah’s current research projects include KidsCam, a project investigating the consumption environment and socialisation influences on children, and the New Zealand Consumer Lifestyles study, which examines ethical consumption practices, frugality, consumer well-being and consumer spending patterns. She is a founding member of the global Future Earth Knowledge Action Network focussing on the UN Sustainable Development Goal of Sustainable Production and Consumption. Leah has published in a number of leading journals including International Marketing Research, Marketing Intelligence and Planning, the Journal of Cleaner Production, the Journal of Consumer Affairs, and the International Journal of Consumer Studies.  Her current research focus is on applying her knowledge of behaviour change theory at the individual, organisational and community level to address the important goal of moving towards a sustainable consumption future.

Recent publications

Aitken, R. and Watkins, L. (2017). ‘Harm or Good?’ Consumer Perceptions of Corporate

Strategic Giving in Schools. Journal of Consumer Affairs. Vol. 51(2), 406-432.

Watkins, L., Aitken, R., Robertson, K., Thyne, M. and Borzekowski, D. (2017).

Environmental Influences on Pre-Schooler’s Understanding of Brand Symbolism. Journal of

Marketing Intelligence and Planning. Vol. 35, 7.

Watkins, L., Aitken, R., Robertson, K. and Thyne, M. (2016). Public and Parental

Perceptions of and Concerns with Advertising to Pre-School Children. International Journal

of Consumer Studies. Vol. 40, 5, 592-600.

Watkins, L., Aitken, R., Robertson, K. and Thyne, M. (2016). Advertising’s Impact on Pre-

Schoolers’ Brand Knowledge and Materialism. International Journal of Consumer Studies.

Vol. 40, 5, 589-591.

Robertson, K., Thyne, M., Watkins, L. and Aitken, R. (2016). Correlates of Parental

Mediation of Pre-schooler’s Advertising Exposure. Young Consumers. Vol. 17, 4, 337-349.

Watkins, L., Aitken, R. and Mather, D. (2015). Conscientious Consumers: A Relationship

between Moral Foundations, Political Orientation and Sustainable Consumption. Journal of

Cleaner Production. Vol. 134, 137-146.

 

Event Details

When: October 1, 2018 at 1:00pm—6:30pm

Where: Sheffield University Management School Conduit Road, Sheffield, S10 1FL

Type: Alumni, Student, Business

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